Day 346 Henry, can you speed it up a little?

Just a comment before the following article.

Take a good look at the picture you see below. It is the Fukushima Daiichi plant’s number 4 reactor. This is the reactor whose building has been rumored to be “leaning”. Interesting that workers are paying particular interest to this building, dismantling the outside walls and clearing debris sooner than those of the other reactor buildings. Could be many reasons for this (lower levels of radiation, perhaps. See article from The Independent below). However, it is a fact that the building holds a spent fuel pool – a tank up above the main floor. In that pool reside, at the moment, 135 tons of fuel. In has also been pointed out that a large aftershock or another, separate quake under the Fukushima plant may occur. Should that happen, it certainly wouldn’t be pretty, and experts are worried about how that fuel would stand up in such a wobbly structure.

Hurry, Henry, hurry.

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Fukushima nuclear plant shown to media, plant chief apologizes for water leaks

Several workers are seen tending to the remains of the No. 4 reactor that was heavily damaged by a hydrogen explosion shortly after the outbreak of the crisis at the Fukushima No. 1 Nuclear Power Plant in this photo taken on Feb. 20. (Mainichi)

Several workers are seen tending to the remains of the No. 4 reactor that was heavily damaged by a hydrogen explosion shortly after the outbreak of the crisis at the Fukushima No. 1 Nuclear Power Plant in this photo taken on Feb. 20. (Mainichi)

OKUMA, Fukushima — The crippled Fukushima No. 1 Nuclear Power Plant was shown to the media on Feb. 20 for the first time since the government declared in December that the nuclear facility had achieved a stable “cold shutdown” state.

The media tour of the nuclear plant was aimed at letting people know about progress being made in efforts to bring the troubled nuclear power station under control. But a rough road still lies ahead for the government and Tokyo Electric Power Co. (TEPCO) to bring the plant under control, as levels of radiation remain high there and truck-mounted pumps to inject water into the reactors leaked water frequently due to the water freezing.

The plant’s chief Takeshi Takahashi, 54, apologized for the repeated water leaks, telling visiting reporters, “We have taken measures primarily to keep key facilities warm, but there is no denying that our calculations were inaccurate.”

Article continues at:

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and a snip from an article over at the Wall Street Journal:

Reactor No. 4 appeared badly damaged but Tepco officials blamed that on the force of the explosion at No. 3. A dozen or so workers could be seen on the roof of that building. That’s near the location of the reactor’s spent-fuel pool – the pool of water where nuclear fuel rods are stored when they’re not active in the reactor. Since unit 4 had been undergoing major maintenance at the time of the disaster, all the reactor’s fuel rods were in the pool for storage, making it a particular concern for experts worried about the weight of the fuel in a building that may have been damaged by the magnitude 9 earthquake last March.

Read the entire article at:

http://blogs.wsj.com/japanrealtime/2012/02/20/another-look-at-the-inside-of-fukushima-daiichi/

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Greater jolts may hit capital in future Tokyo Bay quake: gov’t study

http://english.kyodonews.jp/news/2012/02/142937.html

TOKYO, Feb. 21, Kyodo

A future earthquake in the northern part of Tokyo Bay could register the maximum 7 on the Japanese intensity scale in the capital, stronger than the previously assumed upper 6, a recent study by an education ministry project team showed Tuesday.

The larger intensity estimate for the envisaged quake of magnitude 7.3, which is one of the major quakes predicted to hit Tokyo, comes from a finding that its epicenter could be shallower than previously thought, according to the study.

When a quake of intensity upper 6 or 7 strikes, people cannot stay standing, most unsecured furniture moves and wall tiles and windows are likely to break and fall outdoors, but the furniture may even be thrown through the air in the latter case while reinforced concrete block walls may also collapse, the Japan Meteorological Agency says.

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From The Wall Street Journal

Picture Japan: Back Inside Fukushima Daiichi

http://blogs.wsj.com/japanrealtime/2012/02/21/picture-japan-back-inside-fukushima-daiichi/?mod=WSJBlog&utm_source=twitterfeed&utm_medium=twitter

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Survey: 95% of disaster debris not yet disposed of

http://www3.nhk.or.jp/daily/english/20120221_20.html

The Japanese Environment Ministry says 95 percent of debris from last year’s disaster in northeastern Japan has yet to be disposed of more than 11 months on.

The March 11 quake and tsunami created more than 22 million tons of debris on the coasts of hardest-hit Iwate, Miyagi and Fukushima Prefectures alone.

The ministry said on Tuesday that just over one million tons, or 5 percent, of debris has been either incinerated or buried. 72 percent is still stored at temporary sites.

The ministry says many of the incinerators planned for disaster-stricken municipalities have yet to enter operation. It cites the difficulty in finding sites for new incinerators.

The ministry also says disposal in other areas of Japan, expected to shoulder 4 million tons of debris, has hardly begun.

Environment Minister Goshi Hosono told reporters the ministry’s goal of completing disposal by the end of March, 2014 is unrealistic.

He asked municipalities outside the disaster-affected region to help, noting that delays are greatly hampering reconstruction.

Tuesday, February 21, 2012 13:25 +0900 (JST)

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More on the media’s visit to Daiichi from EX-SKF at:

http://ex-skf.blogspot.com/2012/02/independent-fukushima-return-to.html

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2012

The Independent: Fukushima – Return to the disaster zone

Unlike the Japanese MSM who posted perfunctory reports on their press tour of Fukushima I Nuclear Power Plant on February 20, 2012, David McNeill writing for UK’s The Independent filed a more detailed, personal report on his return to Fukushima I Nuke Plant, as follows:

The Independent (2/21/2012)

Fukushima: Return to the disaster zone

By David McNeill

The journey to Fukushima Daiichi begins at the border of the 12-mile exclusion zone that surrounds the ruined nuclear complex, beyond which life has frozen in time. Weeds reclaim the gardens of empty homes along a route that emptied on a bitterly cold night almost a year ago. Shop signs hang unrepaired from the huge quake that rattled this area on 11 March, triggering the meltdown of three reactors and a series of explosions that showered the area with contamination. Cars wait outside supermarkets where their owners left them in Tomioka, Okuma and Futaba – once neat, bustling towns. Even birds have deserted this area, if recent research is to be believed.

The reason is signalled by a symphony of beeping noises from dosimeters on our bus. As we drive through a police checkpoint and into the town of Tomioka, about 15km from the plant, the radioactivity climbs steadily, hitting 15 microsieverts per hour at the main gate to the nuclear complex. At the other end of the plant, where the gaping buildings of its three most damaged reactors face the Pacific Ocean, the radiation level is 100 times this high, making it still too dangerous to work there.

Inside the plant’s emergency co-ordination building, the air is filled with the sound of humming filters labouring to keep the contamination out. Hundreds of people work here, many sleeping in makeshift beds. Workers in radiation suits and full-face masks wander in and out. A large digital clock showing the current radiation reading inside the building dominates the wall of the central control room, where officials from operator Tokyo Electric Power (Tepco) huddle around computers.

“Our main challenge now is to remove the nuclear fuel from the reactors,” explains Takeshi Takahashi in his first interview since he took over as plant manager two months ago. “It’s a technically very difficult problem, but we cannot hurry.” His predecessor Masao Yoshida was forced to quit in December after being diagnosed with cancer – unrelated to his work, insists Tepco.

Mr Takahashi looks exhausted but says he is satisfied with the progress being made in bringing the plant to “a state of cold shutdown”, meaning radiation releases are under control and the temperature of its nuclear fuel is consistently below boiling point.

The term is considered controversial. Engineers have only a rough idea of where exactly the melted fuel lies inside the damaged reactors, or of its exact state. The fuel is being kept cool by thousands of gallons of water that Tepco pumps on to it every day and which it is struggling to decontaminate. Engineers are frantically working to build more water tanks – on a ridge about 65ft from the reactors is a field of 1,000-ton water tanks. A crew is levelling land to make way for more.

We are told to wear our full-face masks for the climax of the visit – a tour of the six reactors. Every inch of our bodies is covered and even in the sub-zero temperatures of Fukushima in February, it is unbearably hot. Thousands of men worked through last year’s summer heat of over 30C in this protective gear, struggling to clear debris and bring water to the reactors. “They were dropping like files in the heat,” said one worker. “But they just had to keep going.”

“The worst time was when the radiation was 250 milisieverts [per year – the maximum, temporary government limit] and we couldn’t find people to do the work,” explains Kazuhiro Sakamoto, an onsite subcontractor. “We could only work in two-minute bursts, when we were extracting caesium from contaminated water.”

Some of that work is clear on site. The concrete building housing Reactor One, blown apart in the first explosion on 12 March, is now completely covered with a tarpaulin to contain its radioactivity. As our bus drives past the building, the beeping dosimeters climb to 100 microsieverts an hour. But as the most badly damaged Reactor Three looms into sight, its mess of tangled metal and steel gives off a startling reading of 1,500 microsieverts. Its cargo of lethal fuel includes plutonium and the roof of the building housing the reactor was blown off in the second explosion. “It’s still too dangerous for workers to enter Reactor Three,” says engineer Yasuki Hibi.

The state of Reactor Two, meanwhile, sparked some panic last week after Tepco reported that the heat of the fuel inside was climbing and apparently resisting efforts to bring it down. The nightmare scenario of another out-of-control reactor was briefly conjured up by the media before Tepco banished it by claiming faulty equipment. “We’ve identified the problem as a broken thermometer,” says Mr Takahashi, adding: “I’m terribly sorry to everyone for causing so much concern.”

Tepco officials constantly apologise. The apologies have become perfunctory and ritualised, failing to douse public anger over the scale of the disaster, or some of the company’s sharp-elbowed tactics since it began. Compensation has dribbled into the pockets of over 100,000 evacuees who have lost everything and are stuck in legal limbo, without homes or clear futures. In one now infamous incident, the utility argued against a compensation claim by a golf course operator, saying radioactive materials from the nuclear plant belong to individual landowners, and are not the company’s responsibility. Lawyers for the Sunfield Nihonmatsu Golf Club, 28 miles west of the plant, said they were “flabbergasted” by the argument.

But here at the Daiichi complex at least, the apologies seem genuine. Work here is hard, unrelenting and, in the long term, possibly fatal. The depth of feeling about this catastrophe is etched on the faces of hollow-eyed managers like Mr Takahashi, who live day and night in one of the world’s least hospitable workplaces. He says he is motivated above all by one thing: “We will try to allow people to return to their homes as early as possible.”

It is a mammoth task. Japan’s government has admitted that dismantling the reactors and its 260-ton payload of nuclear fuel will take up to 40 years. Many people believe the government and Tepco will eventually be forced to recognise that the people who fled from this plant a year ago may not return for decades. In the meantime, the work at Fukushima Daiichi goes on. And on.

I think McNeill may be wrong in stating in square brackets that “250 millisieverts” the onsite subcontractor mentioned was “per year”. I think the subcontractor may have meant “per hour”; thus work in 2-minute burst so that the exposure could be limited to less than 10 millisieverts for the workers. In the first 10 days or so of the accident, the radiation levels in some locations in the plant were extremely high, measured in millisievert/hour instead of microsievert/hour.

On March 16, for example, the radiation level was400 millisieverts/hour on the 4th floor of Reactor 4. TEPCO actually send one of the employees up the reactor building to measure the level. I hope he ran back down as fast as he could.

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Hardly Any Coverage in Japanese Mainstream Media About 2/20 Fukushima I Nuke Plant Tour

Asahi Shinbun online has 4 lines and one small picture.

Yomiuri online has a decent length article but hardly any new insight or information other than “1,500 microsieverts/hour” radiation near the reactors and that the reporter’s cumulative radiation exposure from 4 hour-plus spent on the plant was 79 microsieverts.

Article continues at:

http://ex-skf.blogspot.com/2012/02/hardly-any-coverage-in-japanese.html

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Gov’t emergency headquarters refused to conduct additional thyroid testing on children

Children visit the Fukushima Medical University Hospital in Fukushima city to undergo a health examination for thyroid abnormalities on Oct. 10. (Mainichi)

Children visit the Fukushima Medical University Hospital in Fukushima city to undergo a health examination for thyroid abnormalities on Oct. 10. (Mainichi)

The government’s Nuclear Emergency Response Headquarters did not fulfill requests from the Cabinet’s Nuclear Safety Commission of Japan (NSC) to conduct further testing on the internal radioactive exposure of children whose levels were within the maximum allowable amount, but nonetheless high, it has emerged.

Between March 26 and March 30 last year, the emergency headquarters used simple radiation sensors to test thyroid radiation exposure among 1,080 children between the ages of 0 and 15. The children were living in areas outside the 30-kilometer radius from the Fukushima No. 1 Nuclear Power Plant where high levels of radiation exposure were likely.

None of the children registered radiation exposure levels exceeding 0.2 microsieverts per hour, the figure set by the NSC as one above which children would be required to undergo a more thorough examination. However, one child from the Fukushima Prefecture city of Iwaki registered 0.1 microsieverts per hour, whose accumulated thyroid exposure to radiation was calculated to be around or above 30 millisieverts.

On March 30, after the NSC was informed of the results from the government’s nuclear emergency headquarters, NSC asked that additional tests be conducted on the child with a thyroid monitor, which is capable of taking more precise measurements.

“Because iodine has a short half life, it’s hard to get a grasp of what’s going on unless measurements are taken early on,” an NSC official explains.

On April 1, 2011, however, the government’s emergency headquarters decided not to conduct further tests, citing “the difficulty of transporting a 1-ton thyroid monitor,” “requiring the child to travel long distances for tests,” and “risk of spreading extreme panic and making the child, the child’s family and their local community targets of unwarranted discrimination” as reasons.

Yasumasa Fukushima, head of the nuclear emergency headquarters’ medical support division, says: “I don’t know what specifically transpired at the time, but ultimately the parties involved agreed not to conduct further testing. Thinking back on it now, we should have.”

“Perhaps we should have used stronger language in appealing for further tests,” says an NSC official. “We weren’t satisfied with the emergency headquarters’ response, but we feared that we would be stepping on toes and didn’t push the matter any further.”

Last June, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) changed its guidelines for ingesting potassium iodide to prevent thyroid exposure to radioactive iodine. Based on information that accumulated thyroid exposure to radiation of 50 millisieverts can elevate the risk of thyroid cancer in children, the standard was lowered from 100 millisieverts to 50 millisieverts. The 30 millisieverts detected in the child from Iwaki was not far from that limit, and depending on how the crisis unfolded, the situation could have gotten worse.

Meanwhile, Yoshihisa Matsumoto, an associate professor of radiobiology at Tokyo Institute of Technology says: “Based on data we have obtained, I don’t think we’ll see an increase in thyroid cancer in Fukushima. But if more precise data had been collected at the time, it could have been used to put residents’ minds more at ease.”

(Mainichi Japan) February 21, 2012

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This, via ENENEWS:

http://enenews.com/telegraph-govt-secretly-planning-evacuate-90000-citizens-japan-fukushima-50-forbidden-speaking-publicly-terrified-agonising-death-radiation-poisoning-new-bbc-doc-thursday

Telegraph: US gov’t was secretly planning to evacuate 90,000 citizens from Japan — Fukushima 50 forbidden from speaking publicly — Terrified of agonising death from radiation poisoning — New BBC doc Thursday

Title: The aftershocks still hitting Japan – Telegraph
Source: Telegraph
Date: Feb 19, 2012

[…] Until now those engineers — known as the Fukushima 50 — have not spoken […] forbidden from speaking by Tepco […]BBC researchers spent eight months persuading them to talk on camera, for a This World programme […]

Some admit they thought of escaping, terrified of an agonising death from radiation poisoning […]

One who spoke on film was Takashi Sato, a reactor inspector. He recalls: “In the control room, people were saying we were finished. They were saying it quietly — but they were saying it. We felt we had to flee.”

[…] the US government was secretly planning to evacuate 90,000 citizens from Japan. […]

“It was an emergency operation and we were in a hurry,” one said. “No one complained, we all understood. Even if it broke the rules, we kept quiet about it. I felt the weight of Japan’s future on my shoulders. I felt that I had to carry the flag of Japan.” […]

Read the report here

‘This World. Inside the Meltdown’ is on BBC 2, 9pm, Thursday

 

 

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Chernobyl experts see hope for Fukushima

AP

Ukrainian nuclear experts say Japanese evacuated from around the stricken Fukushima nuclear plant should be able to return to their homes — unlike near the Chernobyl plant, which is still off-limits a quarter-century after the meltdown accident.

News photo
Twisted metal: Gray smoke rises from the ruins of the building that housed reactor 3 at the stricken Fukushima No. 1 power plant in Okuma, Fukushima Prefecture, on March 21, 2011. APThe public may eventually be able to visit the Fukushima No. 1 power plant, where three reactor cores melted after the tsunami March 11 last year knocked out their cooling systems, said Oleg Nasvit, a nuclear physicist and radiation expert at Kiev’s National Institute for Strategic Studies.

Ukrainian government officials Nasvit and Dmytro Bobro said a crucial lesson from the 1986 Chernobyl disaster is that the government needs to tell the people the truth so they can make informed decisions about their future.

“Residents can understand the consequences and make realistic decisions only based on accurate information,” Bobro said on a visit to Japan to attend a seminar on the Fukushima crisis sponsored by the central government.

Japanese authorities and regulators have been repeatedly criticized for how they handled information during the unfolding nuclear crisis.

Officials initially denied that the reactors had melted down, and have been accused of playing down the health risks of exposure to radiation. An outside panel investigating the government response to the nuclear crisis has also called for more transparency in relaying information to the public.

After declaring that the Fukushima plant was stable in December, Japan has set guidelines that allow residents to return to areas with contamination levels below 20 millisieverts per year — about three CAT scans — which it says is safe, although a further reduction is required.

More than 100,000 people were displaced from a 20-km radius no-entry zone.

Any decision on whether to allow residents to return should be based on radiation dose levels rather than distance from the plant, Nasvit said.

“If people like to return and they will have a dose of less than 20 millisieverts per year, according to international standards this is possible,” Nasvit said. “This is not about this circle of 20 km but it is about the radiological situation. If this is from the radiological point of view permissible, why not return part of this territory to people?”

But further decontamination efforts are a must, he said.

 Article continues at:

 http://www.japantimes.co.jp/text/nn20120221f1.html

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Cesium in Tokyo Bay focus of new study

The government is trying to get a clearer picture of radioactive cesium accumulations at the bottom of Tokyo Bay, which derive from the crippled Fukushima No. 1 nuclear power plant.

Article continues at:

http://ajw.asahi.com/article/0311disaster/fukushima/AJ201202210005?fb_comment_id=fbc_10150704595001414_22839337_10150706483676414#f485a89c8

 

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Radiation-Measuring System Begins Operating in Fukushima

http://jen.jiji.com/jc/eng?g=eco&k=2012022101085

Tokyo, Feb. 21 (Jiji Press)–A radiation-measuring system installed by the Japanese government started operations on Tuesday in the northeastern prefecture of Fukushima, home to Tokyo Electric Power Co.’s <9501> disaster-hit Fukushima No. 1 nuclear plant.
The system has been installed at 2,669 locations, including elementary, junior high and high schools, parks and libraries, by the education ministry. The government plans to set up the measuring equipment at a total of 2,700 sites.
The system displays average radiation levels in the air every 10 minutes between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m. The data are also available on the ministry’s Web site.

(2012/02/21-18:26)

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Goshi Hosono on Disaster Debris Burning: “It’s Only 33 Kilograms Per Person…”

Minister of the Environment Goshi Hosono, who was better known for his extramarital affair with a popular actress before Fukushima I Nuclear Power Plant blew up, tells the citizens of Japan on an NHK interview: “It’s only 33 kilograms of disaster debris from Miyagi and Iwate per person who lives outside Miyagi and Iwate.”

As if it’s a good thing.

Article continues at:

http://ex-skf.blogspot.com/2012/02/goshi-hosono-on-disaster-debris-burning.html

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Former Career Bureaucrats-Turned Politicians in Kawasaki, Kanagawa and Oita Eager to Ignore the Residents’ Opposition, Want to Burn Disaster Debris

They are both graduates from Tokyo University Law School. After their career in the national government bureaucracy, they “descended from heaven” and landed on political careers.

Mayor Takao Abe of Kawasaki City, Kanagawa Prefecture was actually the first to declare war against citizens who do not want to have disaster debris that has been contaminated with the fallout from Fukushima I Nuclear Power Plant to be burned in their midst (literally) and buried. On April 6, 2011 he declared his city would accept disaster debris from FUKUSHIMA (not Miyagi or Iwate) and burn it in the city’s incineration plant.

Mayor Abe says he will simply ignore the opposition when it comes to disaster debris processing in his city, and he will be willing to go it alone without the prefecture-wide consensus in Kanagawa (because there won’t be any).

Article continues at:

http://ex-skf.blogspot.com/2012/02/former-career-bureaucrats-turned.html

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Takahama reactor shuts down, leaving only 2 units online in Japan

Tomari Nuclear Power Plant is pictured in this aerial photo taken from a Mainichi helicopter on July 10, 2010. (Mainichi)

Tomari Nuclear Power Plant is pictured in this aerial photo taken from a Mainichi helicopter on July 10, 2010. (Mainichi)

FUKUI, Japan (Kyodo) — Kansai Electric Power Co. suspended the No. 3 reactor of its Takahama nuclear power plant in Fukui Prefecture early Tuesday for a scheduled checkup, leaving only two out of a total 54 commercial reactors operating in Japan.

Article continues at:

http://mdn.mainichi.jp/mdnnews/news/20120221p2g00m0dm019000c.html

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Quake in Missouri?

http://earthquake-report.com/2012/02/20/earthquakes-list-february-21-2012/

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