Day 335 The Eyes have it!

Coming up on 11 months tomorrow. This is a heart-wrenching movie that I found very difficult to watch…. Thanks to a reader, J, for sending me the URL. 

Japan’s Tsunami Caught On Camera

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And this, photos of post-3/11 and today, from the NationalPost (Canada):

See how Japan has rebuilt in the 11 months since the earthquake and tsunami

http://news.nationalpost.com/2012/02/09/see-how-japan-has-rebuilt-in-the-11-months-since-the-earthquake-and-tsunami/

 

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Folks in the temporary housing units in areas of Tohoku are having a rough time. It’s FREEZING up there, lots of snow, and, according to a Yahoo news report, the water pipes in some of the units froze, leaving residents without water.

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The latest from Arnie Gundersen:
(Via NuclearFreePlanet.org)
Fairewinds shows that the nuclear industry’s plan to vent the containment at Fukushima Daiichi could not have prevented a containment failure and the ensuing explosions. Look at the graphics from the containment stress tests conducted more than 40 years ago at a US nuclear reactor identical to Fukushima Daiichi Unit 1. This video and its graphics provide important clues about why Fukushima Daiichi Unit 1 exploded.

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Fukushima I Nuke Plant Reactor 2 RPV Temperature Remains Near 70 Degrees Celsius Despite Increased Water Injection

70.6 degrees Celsius at 5AM on February 9, 67.9 degrees Celsius twelve hours later at 5PM.

TEPCO’s thinking on this: It will go down eventually, someday. (Seriously.)

Article continues at:

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From ENENEWS regarding *Dai NI*, not Daiichi:

Yomiuri: Fukushima Daini was ‘near meltdown’ admits head of plant — “At the moment, I can only say we’ll maintain a STATE of cold shutdown”

Title: Fukushima No. 2 plant was ‘near meltdown’
Source: The Yomiuri Shimbun
Date: Feb. 10, 2012

The Fukushima No. 2 nuclear power plant was “near meltdown”  […] according to the head of the plant. […]

Plant chief Naohiro Masuda, in charge of plant operations since the crisis, told reporters Wednesday, “The No. 2 plant almost suffered the same fate as No. 1.”

[…] a Nuclear Emergency Situation Declaration was issued for both the No. 1 and No. 2 plants. The declaration was lifted for the No. 2 plant in December.

The Problem Then

[…] The tsunami caused the No. 2 plant’s seawater pumps, used to cool reactors, to fail. Of the plant’s four reactors, three were in danger of meltdown.

Luckily, one external high-voltage power line still functioned, allowing plant staff in the central control room to monitor data on internal reactor temperatures and water levels.

By March 15, the No. 2 plant’s four reactors reached a state of cold shutdown without any leakage of radioactive materials. […]

The Problem Now

The Fukushima prefectural government conducted an on-site inspection at the No. 2 plant on Wednesday and repeated a request to TEPCO to decommission the facility.

Masuda did not elaborate and said, “At the moment, I can only say we’ll maintain a state of cold shutdown.”

Read the report here

It’s not entirely clear what the statement “By March 15, the No. 2 plant’s four reactors reached a state of cold shutdown without any leakage of radioactive materials” means.

A) Was there no leakage at any time?
or
B) Was there not leakage after the plant reached a ‘state of cold shutdown’ on March 15?

Also, why use the phrase “state of cold shutdown” instead of “cold shutdown”? “State” is also included when referring to the “state of cold shutdown” at Fukushima Daiichi. As three full meltdowns/melt-throughs occurred at Daiichi, using the same terminology to describe Daini is troubling.

See entire article at:

http://enenews.com/breaking-yomiuri-fukushima-daini-was-near-meltdown-admits-head-of-plant-at-the-moment-i-can-only-say-well-maintain-a-state-of-cold-shutdown

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Tsunami was up to 21 meters in Fukushima

The Yomiuri Shimbun

The tsunami that hit Fukushima Prefecture on March 11 was particularly high–possibly up to 21 meters–along the coast in the center of the prefecture where the Fukushima No. 1 nuclear power plant is located, a survey has found.

The height of the tsunami was previously assumed to have been about 15 meters at the nuclear plant, but this could not be confirmed because the area within a 20-kilometer radius of the plant is designated a no-entry zone.

Researchers including Shinji Sato, a professor at the University of Tokyo, obtained permission from local governments to enter this zone, and for the first time since the tsunami, were able to survey coastal areas Monday and Tuesday.

They found that areas struck by higher tsunami were concentrated on the coast in the prefecture’s center. For example, at Tomioka, which is eight kilometers south of the nuclear plant, a tsunami height of 21.1 meters was observed.

The maximum height was 10 meters along much of the coast in the prefecture’s south.

“It is necessary to do more research on what caused the tsunami to hit the central part of the prefecture particularly hard,” Sato said.

(Feb. 9, 2012)

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2077 Bq/Kg of Radioactive Cesium from Dried Shiitake “Made in Japan”

Sure. Iwate Prefecture is Japan alright. Since the company who packaged the dried shiitake claims it has mixed shiitake harvested in different parts of Japan (never mind that they did say the shiitake are mostly from Iwate Prefecture), the label can claim “made in Japan”.

Article continues at:

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From Facebook Page, 

We Are Watching You

(Greenpeace International Picture Desk)
Activists dressed as giant eyes with placards saying: “Have you forgotten the public is watching” and “Don’t rush restarts, We are watching” to protest outside the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (METI), in Tokyo. The Japanese Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency (NISA) is currently holding public meetings to review “stress tests” conducted on Japan’s nuclear plants, of which only three of 54 are currently online. It has been criticised for rushing the process and not listening to public or critical opinion of the reactor restart process.

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And well they should!

TEPCO has paid 229.2 billion yen in damages for nuclear crisis

A TEPCO assistance center, where a two-hour waiting line formed after just 30 minutes, is pictured in the city of Fukushima on Sept. 20. (Mainichi)

A TEPCO assistance center, where a two-hour waiting line formed after just 30 minutes, is pictured in the city of Fukushima on Sept. 20. (Mainichi)

Tokyo Electric Power Co. (TEPCO), operator of the crippled Fukushima No. 1 nuclear plant, has paid approximately 229.2 billion yen in damages to victims so far, a company executive said.

As of Feb. 7, the company had received about 86,500 claims for compensation for financial losses the applicants say were caused by the nuclear disaster triggered by the March 11, 2011 tsunami. The company has paid compensation to about 45,900 of the applicants — about 30,000 individuals and 15,900 companies and other organizations — through settlements, managing director Naomi Hirose told the government’s nuclear crisis damage dispute examination panel on Feb. 9.

If compensation paid earlier by the utility as a provisional measure is included, the figure rises to some 370.5 billion yen.

(Mainichi Japan) February 10, 201⇄❖⇄❖⇄❖⇄❖⇄❖⇄❖⇄❖⇄❖⇄❖⇄❖⇄❖⇄❖⇄❖⇄❖⇄❖⇄

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Radiation in Japan: Decontamination Work in 70 – 130 Microsieverts/Hr Location in Fukushima

What is the point here?

Contract workers pile up plastic bags containing highly contaminated soil on the ground in one of the most contaminated area in the entire Fukushima Prefecture. (Photo from Yomiuri)

This particular location, Ottozawa District of Okuma-machi (where Fukushima I Nuclear Power Plant is located), regularly measures well over 100 microsieverts/hour in air radiation 1 meter off the ground.

Just 6 days ago (2/3/2012 in Japan), the air radiation was 130 microsieverts/hour in Ottozawa District, according to Fukushima Minyu. The newspaper says the levels of radiation haven’t changed much.

At 130 microsieverts/hour, if one stands there 24/7 for a year, it will be 1138.8 millisieverts, or 1.138 sievert, per year. (Only Professor Wade Allison may say it is safe.)

Article continues at:

http://ex-skf.blogspot.com/2012/02/radiation-in-japan-decontamination-work.html

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