Day 153 Liza – it’s working, it’s working!!!

Five months ago today. People without homes are still in shelters. Debris along thee coast and in the sea is still left standing. And hundreds of volunteers still working round the clock to get things back to whatever can be called “normal” after a disaster of this size. Thank goodness for their tireless efforts.

And for the people risking their lives at Fukushima Daiichi.

Five months into an ongoing event with no end in sight. As Aileen Miyoko Smith said in her short speech, the radiation is still spewing forth. How is it possible that the government could even conceive of allowing residents to return to live within the 20km radius. Unpardonable.

Yet, Henry is jumping up and down today because the system of filtering some of the radioactivity out of the cooling water appears to be working to a certain degree. Liza’s wondering how much duct tape he’s found…

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Water treatment system enjoys record-high 77 percent operating rate

Tokyo Electric Power Co. (TEPCO) begins a trial run of a contaminated water treatment system, developed by France’s Areva SA, on June 15. (Photo courtesy of TEPCO)
The operating rate of a radioactive water treatment system at the crippled Fukushima No. 1 Nuclear Power Plant stood at a record 77.4 percent between Aug. 3 and 9 after the system became operational on June 28, Tokyo Electric Power Co. (TEPCO) announced Aug. 10.

But Junichi Matsumoto, deputy chief of TEPCO’s nuclear power division, said there may be a slight delay in achieving the utility’s objective of treating radioactive water through the circulating injection cooling system within this year due to a series of mishaps.

article continues at:
http://mdn.mainichi.jp/mdnnews/news/20110811p2a00m0na007000c.html

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Outgoing nuclear agency chief was aware of possible meltdown at Fukushima plant


Nobuaki Terasaka, outgoing director general of the Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency, holds a news conference on Aug. 10. (Mainichi)
Nobuaki Terasaka, outgoing director general of the Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency (NISA), said Aug. 10 that he was aware of the possibility of a meltdown at the Fukushima No. 1 Nuclear Power Plant due to the detection of cesium on March 12, a day after the Great East Japan Earthquake and tsunami crippled the plant.

“I thought the possibility (of a meltdown) cannot be ruled out,” Terasaka said at a news conference. His comment drew close attention because a NISA spokesman in March was replaced shortly after he admitted such a possibility.

The government said in June that the No. 1 to 3 reactor cores experienced meltdowns shortly after the March 11 natural disasters.

article continues at:
http://mdn.mainichi.jp/mdnnews/news/20110811p2a00m0na005000c.html

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Japan marks 5 months from quake as survivors adapt to new life
MORIOKA, Japan, Aug. 11, Kyodo
http://english.kyodonews.jp/news/2011/08/108417.html

Memorial services took place Thursday to mark the passing of five months since the March 11 earthquake and tsunami, with survivors mourning the loss of their loved ones while gradually beginning to find comfort from signs of reconstruction.

More than 15,600 people have been confirmed dead and police continue to search for over 4,700 others who are still missing.

”I am reminded strongly once again today that we must work hard toward reconstruction,” Prime Minister Naoto Kan said in the morning in response to a reporter’s question at his office in Tokyo.

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Good links from EX-SKF

Radioactive Beef Consumed in School Lunches in 296 Schools in 12 Prefectures in Japan
and 43% of the schools are located in Yokohama City alone.

From Asahi Shinbun (3:02AM JST 8/11/2011):

http://ex-skf.blogspot.com/2011/08/radioactive-beef-consumed-in-school.html

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Fukushima Children Know Radiation Contamination in Fukushima
and want to bring clean water and vegetables as souvenir for their parents after the summer camp.

From the tweets by @s_kiyoe, who set up a summer camp (in Shizuoka Prefecture, I think, judging by the town’s name but I could be wrong) for children in Fukushima Prefecture. The original tweets are in Japanese:

Our fun-filled summer camp was finally over. We all cried at parting, because they didn’t want to go back, and we didn’t want them to go back to Fukushima under the current situation. Many Fukushima children were collecting empty plastic bottles. They said they wanted to fill the bottles with clean, safe water that they drank at the camp and bring them to their parents.

The bus arrived at the temple [where the camp was held] to take the children back to Fukushima. We asked them, “Where would you like to go to buy souvenirs?” They answered “Please take us where we can buy locally-grown vegetables, not supermarkets.” Safe vegetables for their families.

https://twitter.com/#!/s_kiyoe/status/100592597160046592  
The last day of the camp. A child from Tokyo said to a child from Fukushima, “Now it’s my turn to visit you in Fukushima!” The child from Fukushima suddenly looked serious and said “You’d better not come to Fukushima right now.” How could this be allowed? These children went back to the very place they just told others not to go.

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Thursday, Aug. 11, 2011

87,000 still in limbo five months after quake
Grief continues as number of missing recedes
Kyodo

MORIOKA — Memorial services took place Thursday to mark the passing of five months since the March 11 earthquake and tsunami, with survivors mourning the loss of their loved ones while gradually beginning to find comfort from signs of reconstruction.

More than 15,600 people have been confirmed dead and police continue to search for over 4,700 others who are still missing.

“I am reminded strongly once again today that we must work hard toward reconstruction,” Prime Minister Naoto Kan said in the morning in response to a reporter’s question at his office in Tokyo.

The five-month commemoration of the disaster happened to fall around the nation’s Bon festival, a Japanese Buddhist custom to honor the spirits of one’s deceased ancestors in mid-August.

article continues at:
http://search.japantimes.co.jp/cgi-bin/nn20110811x1.html

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